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What Causes Eye Trauma?

When the eye is hit with blunt force, it suddenly compresses and retracts. This can cause blood to collect underneath the affected area, which leads to many of the common symptoms of eye trauma.

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What are the symptoms of Eye Trauma

Symptoms of eye trauma may include

Bruising (black eyes)

Cuts to the eyelid

Eye redness

Swelling

Bleeding between the cornea and iris, known as hyphema

Retinal detachment

Blurred or cloudy vision

Double vision

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Treatments for Eye Trauma?

In minor cases of trauma, such as a black eye from a sports injury, applying cold to the affected area can help bring swelling down, and allow the affected area to heal faster.

However, even in cases where trauma seems minor, every eye injury should be given medical attention.

The best way to avoid eye trauma is to prevent it by using protective eyewear while doing things that may put them at risk. Activities include home repair, yard work, cleaning, cooking,bursting crackers and playing sports.

In most cases of injury, people report not properly protecting their eyes – which shows that proper precautions may prevent an eye injury.

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What is Corneal Abrasion Scratched Eye

Common causes of abrasions to the eye's surface (corneal abrasions) are getting poked in the eye or rubbing the eye when a foreign body is present, such as dust or sand. Corneal abrasions are very uncomfortable and cause eye redness and severe sensitivity to light.

If you know something has scratched your eye, it's very important to see your eye doctor or an emergency room/urgent care center to seek treatment for your eye injury.

Scratches also can make your eye susceptible to infection from bacteria or a fungus. Certain types of bacteria and fungi can enter the eye through a scratch and cause serious harm in as little as 24 hours. Even blindness can result. This is especially true if whatever scratched your eye is dirty or contaminated.

Remember also that infections from eye injuries such as scratches can originate from unexpected sources such as a baby's fingernails or tree branches.

If you have a scratched eye, don't rub it. And don't patch your eye, either. Bacteria like dark, warm places to grow, and a patch might provide the ideal environment. Simply keep the eye closed or loosely tape a paper cup or eye shield over it. See your doctor as soon as possible to check out this type of eye injury